Skip to Main Content

Class Notes

Submit Class Note

Class of 1951

Thomas Mitchell

Class of

Thomas Mitchell passed away on Aug. 19, 2022. A veteran, Mitchell served in the Marines during WWII prior to enrolling  at Texas Law. Mitchell began his legal career as a trial lawyer, later establishing his own firm of Mitchell and Doran.

Read More (External link)

Albert Maverick McNeel, Jr

Class of

Albert Maverick McNeel, Jr., died March 31, 2022, in San Antonio. McNeel practiced law in San Antonio for 60 years, retiring in 2012. He was active in the San Antonio Bar Association, serving as editor of the newsletter for two years and then as vice president. He also was on the local Texas State Bar Association Grievance Committee for six years, including three as chairman.

Read More (External link)

Ken Roberts

Ken Roberts

Class of

C. Kenneth Roberts, former Chair of the UT Law School Foundation, Life Trustee, colleague and friend, passed away on Jan. 9, 2022. Roberts earned his JD in 1951 and his Master in Law in 1953. He then served in the US Army before a long, distinguished career in law. He rose to be Vice President and General Counsel of Exxon Corporation and retired in 1995. He was honored for his service to the legal community as Texas Law’s Outstanding Alumnus in 1993. Memorial contributions may be made to The Cary & Kenneth Roberts Endowment for Excellence Scholarship.

Edmund Yates

Class of

Edmund Richardson Yates passed away at 93 in Dallas, TX. Yates served in an Army before going to law school. In 1951, he earned a law degree from The University of Texas Law School and relocated to Dallas to practice law. In 1953, he joined Jack Brady and Ed Drake to form Brady, Drake and Yates Law Firm. Yates was a longtime member of First Baptist in Dallas, serving as a deacon. Ed practiced law until 1962, when he made the decision to join his in-law’s family restaurant, Highland Park Cafeteria.

Read More (External link)

Frank Garrettson Evans, III

Class of
Chief Justice

Frank Garrettson Evans, III ’51, retired Chief Justice of the Texas First Court of (Civil) Appeals passed away peacefully at his home, on November 9, 2019, at 91 years of age. He is indelibly recorded in Texas history for providing citizens with access to justice that improved the lives of countless people who never knew his name, yet benefited greatly from the conflict resolution methods that he pioneered and implemented, including mediation and arbitration. He became widely known as the “father of alternative dispute resolution,” because of his groundbreaking work developing conflict resolution processes and programs outside the usual legal system throughout Texas.

Read More (External link)

Pagination