Faculty Events Calendar: Colloquia, Workshops, Lectures and Conferences

Consistent with its longstanding commitment to fostering a communal environment of intellectual engagement, the Law School is pleased to host countless colloquia, conferences, and guest lectures throughout the school year. Many of these events are specially scheduled, one-time affairs. In addition, the school runs the following regularly scheduled series, which cover a range of formats and scholarly areas.

Upcoming Events

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September 24, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Drawing Board Luncheon - Tom McGarity and Wendy Wagner - "Stealth Deregulation with Science"

Speakers:

Drawing Board Luncheon - Tom McGarity and Wendy Wagner - "Stealth Deregulation with Science"

September 24, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Bhaven Sampat, “The Public Sector Role in Pharmaceutical Innovation: Measurement Issues and Policy Implications”

Speaker:

Claims that the public sector is the source of a large share of important drugs abound, and help form the basis of proposals to change public sector patent laws, to intervene to lower drug costs, to regulate the drug industry more generally, and to increase public research support. In this paper, I argue that the policy discussion needs to pay better attention to the nuances in the empirical literature. Part I of this paper reviews what is known about the public sector role, and provides new updated data extending previous studies. Part II discusses conceptual and measurement issues in linking and attributing public funding to drugs. Part III considers implications for public policy, and emphasizes the importance of distinguishing between the direct and indirect public sector roles when considering changes to patent law and other innovation policies.

September 26, 2018
Wednesday

JON 6.207 (Susman Academic Center, The Judge William W. and Margaret R. Kilgarlin Chambers (6.207 / 6.208))
3:45pm - 5:30pm

Moderator:

Law and Philosophy Workshop - Nelson Tebbe // Cornell and Lawrence Sager // UT

Speakers:

The Law and Philosophy Seminar Workshop surveys different topics in legal philosophy and constitutional theory. Organized around a series of six workshops, each features a different leading scholar who presents and discusses their own work with UT law and philosophy faculty and the students in the seminar.

September 28, 2018
Friday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
2:00pm - 4:00pm

Moderator:

Bookfest - Lucas A. (Scot) Powe Jr.

Speakers:

America's Lone Star Constitution: How Supreme Court Cases from Texas Shape the Nation

October 1, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Barton Beebe, “Testing for Trademark Dilution in the Court and the Lab”

Speaker:

Federal courts are currently split, even within particular districts, on the basic question of what a plaintiff must show to establish that a defendant’s conduct constitutes trademark dilution by blurring. Federal trademark law defines “dilution by blurring” as “association arising from the similarity between a mark or trade name and a famous mark that impairs the distinctiveness of the famous mark.” In construing this statutory language, a majority of courts have held that to establish blurring, a plaintiff need only show that consumers associate the defendant’s mark with the plaintiff’s famous mark. These courts appear to assume that to the extent that there is consumer association, this association alone will “impair the distinctiveness” of the famous mark. A minority of courts have held that the plaintiff must show both consumer association and that the consumer association “impairs the distinctiveness” of the famous mark. In this article, we make two contributions to the current debate over what must be shown to establish dilution by blurring. First, we report the results of a set of experiments that reveal that the majority approach is fundamentally deficient. These experiments demonstrate that even when consumers associate a junior mark with a famous senior mark, this association does not necessarily result in any impairment of the ability of the senior mark to identify its source and associations. For a plaintiff to prove that association leads to blurring, more must be done; we describe a method for determining when association is likely to lead to impairment. Second, we evaluate the current state of the art in trademark dilution survey methodology: response time surveys. These surveys purportedly show both consumer association and impairment. Through a set of experiments, we demonstrate that these surveys currently use the wrong control and are invalid. In light of our findings, we reflect more generally on the question of whether dilution by blurring ever occurs and on how the blurring cause of action may be reconfigured better to comport with courts’ intuitions about the true nature of the harm that the cause of action seeks to address.

October 1, 2018
Monday

JON 6.207 (Susman Academic Center, The Judge William W. and Margaret R. Kilgarlin Chambers (6.207 / 6.208))
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderators:

Business Law Workshop - Edward Fox

Speaker:

Professor Edward Fox of the University of Michigan School of Law will be the guest speaker in todays Business Law Workshop, hosted by Jens Dammann, Mira Ganor and James Spindler.

October 1, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

October 3, 2018
Wednesday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:30pm

Moderator:

Law and Economic Seminar - Manisha Padi // University of Chicago

Speaker:

October 3, 2018
Wednesday

JON 6.207 (Susman Academic Center, The Judge William W. and Margaret R. Kilgarlin Chambers (6.207 / 6.208))
3:45pm - 5:30pm

Moderator:

Law and Philosophy Workshop - Dimitrios Kyritsis // Univ. of Reading School of Law

Speaker:

The Law and Philosophy Seminar Workshop surveys different topics in legal philosophy and constitutional theory. Organized around a series of six workshops, each features a different leading scholar who presents and discusses their own work with UT law and philosophy faculty and the students in the seminar.

October 4, 2018
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Jack Getman / Charles Bennett

Speakers:

October 8, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Drawing Board Luncheon - Calvin Johnson

Speaker:

Calvin Johnson

October 15, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Jessica Silbey, “Against Progress: Intellectual Property and Fundamental Values in the Internet Age”

Speaker:

“Against Progress: Intellectual Property and Fundamental Values in the Internet Age” (book to be published by Stanford University Press, forthcoming 2020)

Abstract: This book studies intellectual property as a bellwether of changing social justice needs in the digital era. It asks questions about the relationship between technological development and socio-economic welfare by tracing through legal cases, media accounts, and over 75 face-to-face interviews varieties of popular legal consciousness and legal arguments that challenge conventional accounts of intellectual property's implications for our society and its future.

October 15, 2018
Monday

JON 6.207 (Susman Academic Center, The Judge William W. and Margaret R. Kilgarlin Chambers (6.207 / 6.208))
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Business Law Seminar - Marc Steinberg

Speaker:

Professor Marc Steinberg of SMU will be the guest speaker in today's Business Law Workshop, hosted by Jens Dammann, Mira Ganor and James Spindler.

October 15, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

October 22, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Drawing Board Luncheon - Larry Sager

Speaker:

Larry Sager

October 22, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Jeanne Fromer, “Playful Innovation” (with Mark Lemley)

Speaker:

“Playful Innovation” (with Mark Lemley) Abstract: Play matters. And it matters to innovation more than the law appreciates. Consider the way we speak about creativity. While people use terms of play to indicate creativity and early-stage innovation—“playing with” an idea or “kicking ideas around”—the use of such terms also implies that play is merely a prelude to something else that is serious and definitive (“we’re merely playing with the idea at this point”). This cramped view of play is both wrong and harmful to innovation. That is because play is integral to both life and innovation, yet patent and copyright laws do not take play seriously (enough).

October 23, 2018
Tuesday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
8:00am - 5:00pm

Moderator:

Cybersecurity Conference

More information to be announced

October 24, 2018
Wednesday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:30pm

Moderator:

Law and Economic Seminar - Lewis Kornhauser // NYU

Speaker:

October 24, 2018
Wednesday

JON 6.207 (Susman Academic Center, The Judge William W. and Margaret R. Kilgarlin Chambers (6.207 / 6.208))
3:45pm - 5:30pm

Moderator:

Law and Philosophy Workshop - Mitchell Berman // Univ. of Pennsylvania Law School

Speaker:

The Law and Philosophy Seminar Workshop surveys different topics in legal philosophy and constitutional theory. Organized around a series of six workshops, each features a different leading scholar who presents and discusses their own work with UT law and philosophy faculty and the students in the seminar.

October 29, 2018
Monday

JON 6.207 (Susman Academic Center, The Judge William W. and Margaret R. Kilgarlin Chambers (6.207 / 6.208))
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Business Law Seminar - Davidoff Solomon

Speaker:

Professor Davidoff Solomon of Berkeley Law will be the guest speaker in today's Business Law Workshop, hosted by Jens Dammann, Mira Ganor and James Spindler.

October 29, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

November 5, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Drawing Board Luncheon - John Golden

Speaker:

John Golden

November 5, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Paul Ohm, “The Many Revolutions of Carpenter”

Speaker:

Abstract: The Supreme Court’s opinion in Carpenter v. United States has been heralded by many as an important victory for the privacy of individuals against government surveillance in our rapidly changing technological age. Despite this, scholars and commentators have surprisingly underappreciated many of the important impacts of this landmark opinion. Carpenter works many small revolutions in Fourth Amendment law, in ways are likely to guide the evolution of privacy in this country for a generation or more.

November 7, 2018
Wednesday

3:45pm - 5:30pm

Moderator:

Law and Philosophy Workshop - Seana Shiffrin // UCLA

Speaker:

The Law and Philosophy Seminar Workshop surveys different topics in legal philosophy and constitutional theory. Organized around a series of six workshops, each features a different leading scholar who presents and discusses their own work with UT law and philosophy faculty and the students in the seminar.

November 8, 2018
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Paul Mahoney // University of Virginia

Speaker:

November 12, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Rachel Sachs, “Regulating Intermediate Technologies”

Speaker:

Abstract: Over the last several years, scholars studying health innovation policy have carefully considered the ways in which administrative agencies do and should regulate different types of technologies to encourage their development and dissemination. Scholars have examined a range of legal incentives, including patents, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) exclusivity periods, taxes, grants, health insurance reimbursement, and other tools to promote socially valuable innovations that our current system has structurally disfavored. This research has considered broad categories of technologies, including drugs, devices, and diagnostics.

November 12, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

November 14, 2018
Wednesday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:30pm

Moderator:

Law and Economic Seminar - Murat Mungan // George Mason University

Speaker:

November 15, 2018
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - David Spence

Speaker:

November 19, 2018
Monday

3:45pm - 5:45pm

Business Law Seminar - Saule Omarova

Speaker:

Professor Saule Omarova of Cornell Law School will be the guest speaker in todays Business Law Workshop, hosted by Jens Dammann, Mira Ganor and James Spindler.

November 26, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45am - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Paul Gugliuzza, “The Supreme Court at the Bar of Patents”

Speaker:

Over the past two decades, a few dozen lawyers have come to dominate practice before the U.S. Supreme Court. By many accounts, these elite lawyers—whose clients are often among the largest corporations in the world—have spurred the Court to hear more cases that businesses care about and to decide those cases in favor of their clients. The Supreme Court’s recent case law on antitrust, arbitration, punitive damages, class actions, and more provides copious examples.

November 26, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Drawing Board Luncheon - Lynn Baker

Speaker:

Lynn Baker

November 26, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

November 28, 2018
Wednesday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:30pm

Moderator:

Law and Economic Seminar - Leyla Karakas // Syracuse University

Speaker:

November 29, 2018
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Sam Buell // Duke University

Speaker:

December 1, 2018
Saturday

JON 6.207 (Susman Academic Center, The Judge William W. and Margaret R. Kilgarlin Chambers (6.207 / 6.208))
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Business Law Workshop - Kent Greenfield

Speaker:

Professor Kent Greenfield of Boston College Law School will be the guest speaker in today's Business Law Workshop, hosted by Jens Dammann, Mira Ganor and James Spindler.

December 3, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45am

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Kristelia Garcia, “Reconceptualizing Copyright’s Term”

Speaker:

The debate over the optimal duration of copyright has occupied legislators, creators, industry leaders, and scholars for decades. The last legislative effort to address copyright’s term—the Copyright Term Extension Act of 1998, popularly known as the “Sonny Bono Act”—extended the period of protection to life of the author plus 70 years (or, in the case of works made for hire, to 95 years from the date of distribution, or 120 years from the date of creation, whichever comes first). While many copyright owners have cheered this development—which brought the U.S. into harmony with some of its foreign counterparts under the Berne Convention—critics have lamented the potential for waste, inefficiency, and overreach that this extended term brings. Notably, most of the arguments for and against a lengthy copyright term are impressionistic. To date, largely due to lack of data, there has been little robust empirical analysis of copyright’s usefulness over time.

Utilizing music industry sales data not previously available for academic analysis, this Article fills an evidentiary gap in the literature. Using recorded music as a case study, we determine that most copyrighted music earns the majority of its lifetime revenue in the first [5-10 years] following its initial release. We thus establish an important empirical baseline for future policy discussion: in the case of information goods such as music, the societal cost of strong copyright protection beyond the point of commercial viability may outweigh the benefit to both creators and consumers as the marginal return on this protection decreases sharply. This overprotection is socially wasteful and does little to incentivize creation or to improve access to content. The empirical argument against a lengthy term of strong copyright protection may well extend beyond music to other information goods such as books, film, and television.

Our analysis contributes to the normative debate around copyright’s incentive-access paradigm by proposing a more efficient conception of copyright’s term: one that replaces the conventional “life plus” durational standard with one based on the commercial viability of the [average?] work.

Biography: In addition to teaching copyright, trademark, and property, Professor García serves as Director of the Content Initiative at the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship, where she hosts an annual content conference. Her research is focused on the intersection of law, technology, and economics, with a particular focus on efficiency, competition, private ordering, and distributive justice. Her work has been published in the California Law Review and the New York University Law Review, among others.

Prior to joining Colorado Law, Professor García was a visiting associate professor and the Frank H. Marks Fellow in Intellectual Property at the George Washington University Law School in Washington, DC. She is also an affiliated fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School. As a practicing lawyer, Professor García worked in the music industry in Los Angeles; first at Quinn Emanuel as outside counsel to Napster, then as Director of Business Development in charge of content licensing at MySpace Music, and most recently in digital strategy as Director at Universal Music Group. Prior to her work in music, she was an associate at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz in New Yor

December 5, 2018
Wednesday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:30pm

Moderator:

Law and Economic Seminar - Florencia Marotta-Wurgler // NYU

Speaker:

December 6, 2018
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Rick Pildes // NYU

Speaker:

December 10, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Drawing Board Luncheon - Oren Bracha

Speaker:

Oren Bracha

January 24, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

January 31, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Lisa Heinzerling // Georgetown Unviersity

Speaker:

February 7, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderators:

Faculty Colloquium - Douglas NeJaime // Yale Law School

Speaker:

February 14, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

February 21, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Liz Sepper // Washington University

Speaker:

February 28, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Susanna Blumenthal // Princeton University

Speaker:

March 14, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Roberta Romano // Yale

Speaker:

March 28, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - David Schleicher // Yale

Speaker:

April 25, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Christina Rodriguez // Yale Law

Speaker:

May 2, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - David Engstrom // Stanford Law

Speaker: