Faculty Events Calendar: Colloquia, Workshops, Lectures and Conferences

Consistent with its longstanding commitment to fostering a communal environment of intellectual engagement, the Law School is pleased to host countless colloquia, conferences, and guest lectures throughout the school year. Many of these events are specially scheduled, one-time affairs. In addition, the school runs the following regularly scheduled series, which cover a range of formats and scholarly areas.

Upcoming Events

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November 19, 2018
Monday

3:45pm - 5:45pm

Business Law Seminar - Saule Omarova

Speaker:

Professor Saule Omarova of Cornell Law School will be the guest speaker in todays Business Law Workshop, hosted by Jens Dammann, Mira Ganor and James Spindler.

November 26, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45am - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Paul Gugliuzza, “The Supreme Court at the Bar of Patents”

Speaker:

Over the past two decades, a few dozen lawyers have come to dominate practice before the U.S. Supreme Court. By many accounts, these elite lawyers—whose clients are often among the largest corporations in the world—have spurred the Court to hear more cases that businesses care about and to decide those cases in favor of their clients. The Supreme Court’s recent case law on antitrust, arbitration, punitive damages, class actions, and more provides copious examples.

November 26, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Drawing Board Luncheon - Lynn Baker

Speaker:

Lynn Baker, “Anatomy of Mass Tort Litigant Finance” (coauthor, Ronen Avraham)

November 26, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Moderator:

Feminist Approaches to the Regulation of Sex Work: Patterns in Transnational Governance Feminist Law Making

Speaker:

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality - Hila Shamir presents "Feminist Approaches to the Regulation of Sex Work: Patterns in Transnational Governance Feminist Law Making," with a response from Christine Williams

Our public debates are increasingly centered on the question of socio-economic inequality – its increase, its economic and political consequences, its importance to the present and its likely future. Inequality may well be at the root of many of the human rights violations in the world today. Our Fall 2018 speaker series will explore the role of law (including, perhaps, human rights law) in the production of inequality, and the role of law (including, of course, human rights law) in responding to inequality. The Colloquium presents an interdisciplinary group of scholars who focus their investigations on the ways in which various legal regimes create, reinforce, and/or ameliorate patterns of structural inequality, locally and globally.

November 28, 2018
Wednesday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:30pm

Moderator:

Law and Economic Seminar - Leyla Karakas // Syracuse University

Speaker:

November 28, 2018
Wednesday

JON 6.207 (Susman Academic Center, The Judge William W. and Margaret R. Kilgarlin Chambers (6.207 / 6.208))
3:45pm - 5:30pm

Moderator:

LAW & PHILOSOPHY WORKSHOP - JOHN FEREJOHN // NYU LAW

Speaker:

The Law and Philosophy Seminar Workshop surveys different topics in legal philosophy and constitutional theory. Organized around a series of six workshops, each features a different leading scholar who presents and discusses their own work with both law and philosophy faculty and the students in the seminar.

November 29, 2018
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Sam Buell // Duke University

Speaker:

December 1, 2018
Saturday

JON 6.207 (Susman Academic Center, The Judge William W. and Margaret R. Kilgarlin Chambers (6.207 / 6.208))
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Business Law Workshop - Kent Greenfield

Speaker:

Professor Kent Greenfield of Boston College Law School will be the guest speaker in today's Business Law Workshop, hosted by Jens Dammann, Mira Ganor and James Spindler.

December 3, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45am

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Kristelia Garcia, “Reconceptualizing Copyright’s Term”

Speaker:

The debate over the optimal duration of copyright has occupied legislators, creators, industry leaders, and scholars for decades. The last legislative effort to address copyright’s term—the Copyright Term Extension Act of 1998, popularly known as the “Sonny Bono Act”—extended the period of protection to life of the author plus 70 years (or, in the case of works made for hire, to 95 years from the date of distribution, or 120 years from the date of creation, whichever comes first). While many copyright owners have cheered this development—which brought the U.S. into harmony with some of its foreign counterparts under the Berne Convention—critics have lamented the potential for waste, inefficiency, and overreach that this extended term brings. Notably, most of the arguments for and against a lengthy copyright term are impressionistic. To date, largely due to lack of data, there has been little robust empirical analysis of copyright’s usefulness over time.

Utilizing music industry sales data not previously available for academic analysis, this Article fills an evidentiary gap in the literature. Using recorded music as a case study, we determine that most copyrighted music earns the majority of its lifetime revenue in the first [5-10 years] following its initial release. We thus establish an important empirical baseline for future policy discussion: in the case of information goods such as music, the societal cost of strong copyright protection beyond the point of commercial viability may outweigh the benefit to both creators and consumers as the marginal return on this protection decreases sharply. This overprotection is socially wasteful and does little to incentivize creation or to improve access to content. The empirical argument against a lengthy term of strong copyright protection may well extend beyond music to other information goods such as books, film, and television.

Our analysis contributes to the normative debate around copyright’s incentive-access paradigm by proposing a more efficient conception of copyright’s term: one that replaces the conventional “life plus” durational standard with one based on the commercial viability of the [average?] work.

Biography: In addition to teaching copyright, trademark, and property, Professor García serves as Director of the Content Initiative at the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship, where she hosts an annual content conference. Her research is focused on the intersection of law, technology, and economics, with a particular focus on efficiency, competition, private ordering, and distributive justice. Her work has been published in the California Law Review and the New York University Law Review, among others.

Prior to joining Colorado Law, Professor García was a visiting associate professor and the Frank H. Marks Fellow in Intellectual Property at the George Washington University Law School in Washington, DC. She is also an affiliated fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School. As a practicing lawyer, Professor García worked in the music industry in Los Angeles; first at Quinn Emanuel as outside counsel to Napster, then as Director of Business Development in charge of content licensing at MySpace Music, and most recently in digital strategy as Director at Universal Music Group. Prior to her work in music, she was an associate at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz in New Yor

December 5, 2018
Wednesday

JON 6.207 (Susman Academic Center, The Judge William W. and Margaret R. Kilgarlin Chambers (6.207 / 6.208))
3:45am - 5:30pm

Moderator:

LAW & PHILOSOPHY WORKSHOP - JOEY FISHKIN // UT LAW

Speaker:

The Law and Philosophy Seminar Workshop surveys different topics in legal philosophy and constitutional theory. Organized around a series of six workshops, each features a different leading scholar who presents and discusses their own work with both law and philosophy faculty and the students in the seminar.

December 5, 2018
Wednesday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:30pm

Moderator:

Law and Economic Seminar - Florencia Marotta-Wurgler // NYU

Speaker:

December 6, 2018
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Rick Pildes // NYU

Speaker:

December 10, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Drawing Board Luncheon - Oren Bracha

Speaker:

Oren Bracha

January 25, 2019
Friday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
3:00pm - 5:00pm

Moderator:

SCOTUS Review Committee of the Whole

Speakers:

Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Commission on Civil Rights

January 31, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Lisa Heinzerling // Georgetown Unviersity

Speaker:

February 7, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderators:

Faculty Colloquium - Douglas NeJaime // Yale Law School

Speaker:

February 21, 2019
Thursday

CCJ 2.306 (Eidman Courtroom)
CCJ 2.300 (Jamail Pavilion)
TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
3:00pm - 8:00pm

The Future of Constitutional Democracy Conference: Keynote

Conference hosted by Prof. Sanford Levinson, Prof. Richard Albert, and Prof. Gary Jacobsohn.

More information to follow.

February 22, 2019
Friday

CCJ 2.306 (Eidman Courtroom)
CCJ 2.300 (Jamail Pavilion)
TNH 2.114 (Francis Auditorium)
8:00am - 5:00pm

The Future of Constitutional Democracy Conference: Day 1

The Future of Constitutional Democracy Conference: Day 1

February 23, 2019
Saturday

CCJ 2.306 (Eidman Courtroom)
CCJ 2.300 (Jamail Pavilion)
8:00am - 3:00pm

The Future of Constitutional Democracy Conference: Day 2

The Future of Constitutional Democracy Conference: Day 1

February 28, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Susanna Blumenthal // Princeton University

Speaker:

March 14, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Roberta Romano // Yale

Speaker:

March 28, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - David Schleicher // Yale

Speaker:

April 4, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Jennifer Chacon // UCLA

Speaker:

April 18, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - William Boyd // Berkeley

Speaker:

April 25, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Christina Rodriguez // Yale Law

Speaker:

May 2, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - David Engstrom // Stanford Law

Speaker: