Faculty Events Calendar: Colloquia, Workshops, Lectures and Conferences

Consistent with its longstanding commitment to fostering a communal environment of intellectual engagement, the Law School is pleased to host countless colloquia, conferences, and guest lectures throughout the school year. Many of these events are specially scheduled, one-time affairs. In addition, the school runs the following regularly scheduled series, which cover a range of formats and scholarly areas.

Upcoming Events

Previous Semester Next Semester

August 31, 2018
Friday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 5:00pm

Moderator:

SCOTUS Review

Speaker:

September 13, 2018
Thursday

CCJ 2.306 (Eidman Courtroom)
6:00pm - 9:00pm

Shakespeare and the Law -- Hamlet

Speaker:

Free Admission. Reception followed by panel on Shakespeare's "Hamlet" Panel members include David Kornhaber, Coordinator, AFTLS; Professors Angela Littwin, UT Law; James Loehlin, Director, Shakespeare at Winedale, and the Spirit of Shakespeare's players.

Panelist will discuss legal and related issues central to "Hamlet".

September 24, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Bhaven Sampat (Columbia, Public Health)

Speaker:

Bhaven Sampat is an associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. He also holds a courtesy affiliation with the University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), where he teaches in the MPA and MIA programs. Sampat also teaches in the Sustainable Development Ph.D. program at the Earth Institute.

An economist by training, Sampat is centrally interested in issues at the intersection of health policy and innovation policy. His current work examines the causes and consequences of generic firms’ challenges to pharmaceutical patents in the U.S., the impact of pharmaceutical patent laws on innovation and access to medicines in the developing countries, the political economy of the National Institutes of Health, and the returns to publicly funded medical research. Sampat has written extensively on the effects of university patenting and the Bayh-Dole Act on academic medicine, and on patent quality issues in the U.S. He continues to be actively involved in policy debates related to these issues.

Sampat has published broadly in economics, law, business, health policy, medical, and life science journals, including past or forthcoming articles in the Review of Economics and Statistics, the International Journal of Industrial Organization, the Emory Law Journal, the North Carolina Law Review, the New England Journal of Medicine, and the American Journal of Public Health, among many others.

Sampat co-created the first free, searchable patent database in India. He was the principal organizer of the TRIPS@10 conference, which was held at Columbia and examined the effects of new global patent laws on developing countries. His work has been funded through grants and prizes from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Merck Foundation, and the Commonwealth Fund.

Sampat received his B.A., M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. in economics from Columbia. He was previously an assistant professor at the School of Public Policy at Georgia Tech, where he won the “Faculty Member of the Year” award for both the 2001–2002 and 2002–2003 academic years. From 2003 to 2005, he was a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar in Health Policy Research at the University of Michigan.

September 28, 2018
Friday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
2:00pm - 4:00pm

Moderator:

Bookfest - Lucas A. (Scot) Powe Jr.

Speakers:

October 1, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Barton Beebe (NYU)

Speaker:

Barton Beebe specializes in the doctrinal, empirical, and cultural analysis of intellectual property law. He has been the Anne Urowsky Visiting Professor of Law at Yale Law School, a Visiting Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, and a Visiting Research Fellow at Merton College, Oxford. He has also taught courses at Hebrew University, Jerusalem, the Center for International Intellectual Property Studies at the Université de Strasbourg, the Munich Intellectual Property Law Center, the State Intellectual Property Office of the People’s Republic of China, and the Hanken School of Economics in Helsinki, Finland. In 2007, Professor Beebe was a Special Master in the case of Louis Vuitton Malletier v. Dooney & Bourke, Inc., No. 04 Civ. 2990 (SAS) (S.D.N.Y.). He is the author of Trademark Law: An Open-Source Casebook, which is a free online trademark casebook now in use in over thirty law schools. His other recent published works include "Testing for Trademark Dilution in Court and the Lab," 86 University of Chicago Law Review __ (2019) (with Roy Germano, Christopher Jon Sprigman, & Joel Steckel) (forthcoming); “Are We Running Out of Trademarks? An Empirical Study of Trademark Depletion and Congestion,” 131 Harvard Law Review 945 (2018) (with Jeanne Fromer); “The Scope of Strong Marks: Should Trademark Law Protect the Strong More than the Weak?,” 92 New York University Law Review 1339 (2017) (with Scott Hemphill); “Bleistein, the Problem of Aesthetic Progress, and the Making of American Copyright Law,” 117 Columbia Law Review 319 (2017); and “Intellectual Property Law and the Sumptuary Code,” 123 Harvard Law Review 809 (2010). Professor Beebe received his J.D. from Yale Law School, his Ph.D. in English Literature from Princeton University, and his B.A. from the University of Chicago. He clerked for Judge Denise Cote of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York.

October 1, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

October 15, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Jessica Silbey (Northeastern)

Speaker:

Professor Silbey is co-director of the law school’s Center for Law, Innovation and Creativity (CLIC). Her research and teaching focus on law’s entanglement with other disciplines such as the humanities and social sciences. In addition to a law degree, she has a PhD in comparative literature and draws on her studies of literature and film to better account for law’s force, both its effectiveness and failing as socio-political regulation. In April 2018, she was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship — one of just 173 scholars, artists and scientists selected from a group of almost 3,000 applicants. While a Guggenheim Fellow, Professor Silbey will work on a book that considers intellectual property debates in law and culture as a bellwether of changing social justice needs in the 21st century. Professor Silbey argues that intellectual property law is becoming a central framework through which to discuss essential socio-political issues, extending ancient debates over our most cherished values, refiguring the substance of “progress” in terms that demonstrate the urgency of art and science to social justice today.

Professor Silbey's last book, The Eureka Myth: Creators, Innovators and Everyday Intellectual Property (Stanford University Press, 2015), altered the national conversation about creativity and invention. Based on a set of 50 interviews with authors, artists, inventors and lawyers, the book challenges the traditional notion of intellectual property as merely creating financial incentives necessary to spur innovation.

Professor Silbey has been invited to speak about her research at the nation’s leading law schools, including Harvard, NYU and Yale, as well as at universities in Canada, England, Australia, France, Germany and Israel. She co-edited (with Peter Robson) Law and Justice on the Small Screen (Bloomsbury, 2012) and is the author of numerous law review articles and publications in other venues. In addition to her research on intellectual property, she writes and speaks about the use of film as a legal tool (body cams, surveillance video, medical imaging) and the representations of law in popular culture (courtroom dramas, reality television). She is an affiliate fellow at Yale’s Information Society Project and was a faculty associate at the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. She was previously chair of the Association of American Law School’s (AALS) national Section on Intellectual Property and has served on the AALS Presidential Conference Film Committee since 2012. She was co-chair of the New England Chapter for the Copyright Society of the United States from 2015-2018. In spring 2018, she is serving as a distinguished lecturer and visiting fellow at the Willson Center for the Humanities and the Arts at the University of Georgia.

Professor Silbey served as law clerk to Judge Robert E. Keeton of the US District Court for the District of Massachusetts and Judge Levin H. Campbell of the US Court of Appeals for the First Circuit. She also spent three years in private law practice, focusing on intellectual property and reproductive rights.

October 15, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

October 22, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Jeanne Fromer (NYU)

Speaker:

Professor Jeanne Fromer specializes in intellectual property, including copyright, patent, trademark, trade secret, and design protection laws. Some of her recent and forthcoming scholarship studies trademark registrations empirically to examine whether we are running out of effective trademarks; the underregulation of certification marks; the protectability of fashion designs in intellectual property; design patent protection; and the role of patent disclosure. She is faculty co-director of the Engelberg Center on Innovation Law & Policy.

Professor Fromer is currently an Adviser for the American Law Institute's Restatement of the Law, Copyright. In 2011, Professor Fromer was awarded the American Law Institute's inaugural Young Scholars Medal for her scholarship in intellectual property.

Before coming to NYU, Professor Fromer served as a law clerk to Justice David H. Souter of the U.S. Supreme Court and to Judge Robert D. Sack of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. She also worked at Hale and Dorr LLP (now WilmerHale) in the area of intellectual property. In addition, she was an Alexander Fellow with the New York University School of Law and a Resident Fellow with Yale Law School’s Information Society Project. Professor Fromer was a visiting professor at Harvard Law School, and she also previously taught at Fordham Law School.

Professor Fromer earned her B.A., summa cum laude, in Computer Science from Barnard College, Columbia University. She received her S.M. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for research work in artificial intelligence and computational linguistics and worked at AT&T (Bell) Laboratories in those same areas. As a graduate student, Professor Fromer was both a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow and an AT&T Laboratories Graduate Research Fellow. Professor Fromer received her J.D., magna cum laude, from Harvard Law School, serving as Articles and Commentaries Editor of the Harvard Law Review and as Editor of the Harvard Journal of Law and Technology.

October 26, 2018
Friday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Justin Driver /// University of Chicago

Speaker:

<

October 29, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

November 5, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Paul Ohm (Georgetown)

Speaker:

Paul Ohm is a Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center. He specializes in information privacy, computer crime law, intellectual property, and criminal procedure. He teaches courses in all of these topics and more and he serves as a faculty director for the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown.

In his work, Professor Ohm tries to build new interdisciplinary bridges between law and computer science. Much of his scholarship focuses on how evolving technology disrupts individual privacy. His articleBroken Promises of Privacy: Responding to the Surprising Failure of Anonymization, 57 UCLA Law Review 1701, has sparked an international debate about the need to reshape dramatically the way we regulate privacy. He is commonly cited and quoted by news organizations including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, and NPR.

Professor Ohm began his academic career on the faculty of the University of Colorado Law School, where he also served as the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Faculty Director for the Silicon Flatirons Center. From 2012 to 2013, Professor Ohm served as Senior Policy Advisor to the Federal Trade Commission. Before becoming a professor, he served as an Honors Program trial attorney in the U.S. Department of Justice’s Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section. Before that, he clerked for Judge Betty Fletcher of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and Judge Mariana Pfaelzer of the United States District Court for the Central District of California. He is a graduate of the UCLA School of Law.

Before attending law school, Professor Ohm worked for several years as a computer programmer and network systems administrator after earning undergraduate degrees in computer science and electrical engineering from Yale University. Today he continues to write thousands of lines of python and perl code each year. Professor Ohm blogs at Freedom to Tinker.

November 12, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45pm - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Rachel Sachs (Washington U.)

Speaker:

Professor Rachel Sachs is a scholar of innovation policy whose work explores the interaction of intellectual property law, food and drug regulation, and health law. Her work explores problems of innovation and access, considering how law helps or hinders these problems. Professor Sachs’ scholarship has or will have appeared in journals that include the Harvard Journal of Law & Technology, the University of California-Davis Law Review, the Yale Journal of Law & Technology, and the peer-reviewed Journal of Law and the Biosciences. Prior to joining the faculty, Professor Sachs was an Academic Fellow at the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics and a Lecturer in Law at Harvard Law School. She also clerked for the Hon. Richard A. Posner of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. She received her J.D. magna cum laude from Harvard Law School and a Master of Public Health from the Harvard School of Public Health. She received her A.B. in Bioethics from Princeton University.

November 12, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

November 26, 2018
Monday

TNH 3.129 (Atlas Seminar Room)
3:45am - 5:45pm

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Paul Gugliuzza (Boston University School of Law)

Speaker:

An award-winning scholar and teacher, Professor Paul Gugliuzza specializes in civil procedure, federal courts, and intellectual property law, with a particular focus on patent litigation. He has published articles in more than a dozen leading law reviews, including the Texas Law Review, the Georgetown Law Journal, the Vanderbilt Law Review, the Notre Dame Law Review, and the Virginia Law Review.

Professor Gugliuzza has received the Dean’s Award in recognition of his teaching at BU Law, and his article, “The Federal Circuit as a Federal Court,” which was published in the William & Mary Law Review, received the annual best article award from the Federal Courts Section of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS). He has also testified before Congress on the topic of patent enforcement.

Professor Gugliuzza graduated summa cum laude from Tulane University School of Law. After law school, he clerked for Judge Ronald M. Gould on the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and practiced in the Issues and Appeals group at Jones Day in Washington, DC. Prior to joining the faculty at BU, Professor Gugliuzza was a visiting assistant professor at the University of Florida Levin College of Law.

November 26, 2018
Monday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
4:00pm - 6:00pm

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

Rapoport Center Colloquium: Law and the Production of Inequality

December 3, 2018
Monday

3:45pm - 5:45am

Moderator:

IPST Workshop: Kristelia Garcia (Colorado)

Speaker:

In addition to teaching copyright, trademark, and property, Professor García serves as Director of the Content Initiative at the Silicon Flatirons Center for Law, Technology, and Entrepreneurship, where she hosts an annual content conference. Her research is focused on the intersection of law, technology, and economics, with a particular focus on efficiency, competition, private ordering, and distributive justice. Her work has been published in the California Law Review and the New York University Law Review, among others.

Prior to joining Colorado Law, Professor García was a visiting associate professor and the Frank H. Marks Fellow in Intellectual Property at the George Washington University Law School in Washington, DC. She is also an affiliated fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School. As a practicing lawyer, Professor García worked in the music industry in Los Angeles; first at Quinn Emanuel as outside counsel to Napster, then as Director of Business Development in charge of content licensing at MySpace Music, and most recently in digital strategy as Director at Universal Music Group. Prior to her work in music, she was an associate at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz in New York.

Professor García graduated cum laude from Columbia University with a BA in Economics and was the recipient of both a Kluge Scholarship for academic achievement and the King's Crown Award for leadership in public service. At Yale Law School, she served as editor-in-chief of the Yale Journal of Law & Technology, and was a co-founder of the school's Student Animal Legal Defense Fund.

January 24, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

January 31, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Lisa Heinzerling // Georgetown Unviersity

Speaker:

February 7, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Douglas NeJaime // Yale Law School

Speaker:

February 14, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

February 21, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Liz Sepper // Washington University

Speaker:

February 28, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Suzanna Blumenthal // Princeton University

Speaker:

March 14, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Roberta Romano // Yale

Speaker:

April 25, 2019
Thursday

TNH 2.111 (Sheffield-Massey Room)
11:30am - 1:00pm

Moderator:

Faculty Colloquium - Christina Rodriguez // Yale Law

Speaker: